Aisha-Bibi mausoleumAisha-Bibi mausoleum

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    A nice Explo, but seems to be quite renowned !
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      A bit short... And no plan!
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The Aisha-Bibi is an 11th or 12th-century mausoleum for a noble woman, on the Silk Road. It is locally famous as a monument to love and faithfulness.

My experience, Explo description: 

According to legend, the mausoleum was built by a Karakhanid Dynasty ruler for his beautiful fiancée Aisha-Bibi, a daughter of Sufi poet Khakim-Ata. Matching the legend, the mausoleum looks light, well-proportioned, and delicate. The mausoleum's architectural forms and decoration are reminiscent of fine lace. The whole building is covered with carved terracotta tiles using 60 different floral geometric patterns and stylized calligraphy.
Aisha Bibi is a direct stylistic descendant of Samanid Mausoleum in Bukhara. Both use the same stylistic conventions of Pre-Mongol Central Asian architecture. These two mausoleums rank among the few surviving examples of pre-Mongol architecture in Central Asia.

Aisha Bibi is part of a larger complex. Ten meters away is a second mausoleum called Babaji Khatun ("wise queen"), and across the road is a sacred limestone cavern. Together with a garden area and parking lot they form the national monument. The complex is sited on a ridge overlooking the Taraz oasis from the west.

There was just an hour to go for 16-year-old beauty Aisha-bibi to meet with her lover. But a tragedy cut the life of the girl… She had estimated herself worthy to marry the Emir of Taraz, and left her home Otrar with her nurse. At the end of their voyage, the two women stopped at the edge of the Talas River to refresh themselves. It is there that bit by a snake, Aisha lost her life. The Emir, informed at the same time of the mission of the young woman and her fine tragedy, came in haste to collect its last sigh and ordered the construction of this tomb. Today nobody can say what color her eyes were. Nobody remembers her voice, habits, and warmth of her hands. But we know the main thing about her: she loved and was beloved.

The site has been venerated since the Middle Ages. Local women from the Taraz Oasis still pray for children and a happy family. It is customary for newlyweds in Taraz to have their union blessed by the dead lovers. Their ritual reenacts the myth. After the ceremony the wedding party retraces Karakhan's journey from Taraz to the site of his fiancée's death. The journey begins at Karakhan Mausoleum in Taraz and ends at the Aisha Bibi, at each location the bride and groom venerate the dead lovers and ask for their blessing.

Russian archeologist V. V. Bartold was the first scientist to record the and study the ruins in 1893. The Soviet Union built a protective glass shell to preserve the monument (c 1960) and used it for the education of students in Taraz and tourism. In 2002, the Republic of Kazakhstan paid Nishan Rameto to restore the Aisha Bibi and built the park infrastructure around it. It is a national monument and is listed by UNESCO.

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How getting there: 

18 km west of Taraz