Gazi Husrev-beg MosqueGazi Husrev-beg Mosque

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  • Off the path Explo
    38 %
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    Score
    1.9 / 5
    Comments
    Very famous mosque in Bosnia
  • Article Quality
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    • Score
      5 / 5
      Comments
      Good description and tips !
    • Score
      2.5 / 5
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      Yes, but no plan ;(
    • Score
      2 / 5
      Comments
      Yes, 2!
    • Score
      5 / 5
      Comments
      Yes!
    • Score
      5 / 5
      Comments
      Yes!
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The Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque, in Sarajevo, is considered the most important islamic structure in Bosnia and one of the world's finest examples of Ottoman architecture. It is located in the Baščaršija neighborhood, and remains one of the most popular centers of worship in the city.

My experience, Explo description: 

The Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque was built by the famous Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan, who would later go on to build the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne for the Sultan Selim I. The mosque was financed in 1531 by Gazi Husrev-beg, the provincial governor of Bosnia. Gazi Husrev-beg is widely considered Sarajevo's greatest patron, as he financed much of Sarajevo's old city at this time.

Magnificent stalactite ornamentation in the angles under the dome and in the place where the imam leads the prayers, as well as other polychromatic decoration, valuable carpets and the light effects through the 51 windows produces a sense of greater space than there is in reality. At every time of prayer in this mosque, the great benefactor Gazi Husrev-beg is remembered.

Gazi Husrev-beg also built the same mosque called Hüsreviye Mosque in Aleppo, Syria, between 1531 and 1534.

During the Siege of Sarajevo, Serbian forces purposely targeted many centers of the city's culture, such as museums, libraries, and mosques, and fired on them generally. As the largest and best known, the Beg's mosque was an obvious target.
Heavily damaged in the war, it was renovated in 1996 with foreign help. Haverford College Professor Michael A. Sells has accused the renovators (whose money came in large part from Saudi Arabia) of Wahhabism in the mosque. Prior to reconstruction, the interior was far more intricate, but today the walls are simply white, much of the detail, artistry, and color taken out. Complete restoration and re-painting of the mosque began in 2000. It has been done mainly by Hazim Numanagić, a Bosnian calligrapher.

My personal recommendations: 

I was there during the Ramadan so I couldn't visit the interior, but stayed in the courtyard. Peaceful atmosphere in the middle of the milling of the neighboor bazaar.

How getting there: 

Park you car in the enter of the city, and visit Baščaršija (bazaar) by foot. Mosque is in the middle.

A tip to eat: 

Everywhere in the Baščaršija! During the Ramadan, when the minaret is light, everybody rush at the small restaurant.

Useful information: 
Open hours: 

Open for tourists between prayers, except during Ramadan